Progress in the scale and quality of energy programming for humanitarian response cuts across a range of thematic areas. The GPA is used as a platform to connect individuals and organisations around delivering collective activities. The GPA Coordination Unit and Steering Group members support the delivery of the recommendations in the GPA Framework document through advancing collective work in the following thematic working areas.

Vision

All stakeholders engaged in planning and implementing sustainable energy solutions in situations of displacement coordinate smoothly within and across sectors, so that activities are not duplicated, resources are not wasted, lessons learned are shared, and best practices are institutionalised.

Within this, it is envisioned that all stakeholders engaged in planning and implementing humanitarian energy interventions as well as early recovery coordination, especially for displaced people and host communities:

  • Are aware of, and engaged in, project coordination mechanisms that aim to reduce duplication and increase collaboration;
  • Know where to share and access critical data, including needs assessments and information about previous and concurrent energy interventions in the affected area;
  • Make use of this information as part of due diligence to improve future programmes; and
  • Can ameliorate or overcome potential barriers to full participation, including language, geographic distance, and data connectivity.

The GPA-led coordination mechanisms:

Other existing coordination mechanisms:

Vision

The vision for this working area is to “unlock wide ranging policy and governance change, which will make it easier to meet the energy needs of displaced people”. In particular, this will mean the following:

  • At the international level, States and other stakeholders agree to a global policy framework that encapsulates a clear vision. This commitment fosters systematic change, allows innovative financing, and enables all stakeholders to measure progress towards energy goals for displaced people in terms of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
  • At the national level, the energy needs of displaced people are incorporated into development, energy and climate change action plans as well as national level preparedness and contingency planning.
  • At the community level, local policies enable the investment in financially sustainable clean energy services for the benefit of displaced populations and host communities.
  • At the sectoral level, energy-service considerations and priorities are integrated into programming. Donors and humanitarian actors are actively making provision for sustainable energy solutions, safer and cleaner fuels that contribute to local sustainable development objectives.

GPA’s work within this workstream:

Vision

Financing mechanisms that can be tailored to the needs of different projects that improve energy access and management within displacement settings are designed, tested, and scaled up. These cover a range of energy needs, including:

  • Consumptive use (such as household cooking and lighting)
  • Productive use (such as power for small businesses and machinery)
  • Public use (such as street lighting and power for health facilities)

 

In addition, these projects increase the purchasing power of end users and small businesses; for example, through increasing the availability of credit, creating livelihood opportunities, or the use of cash transfers in line with the core commitments of the ‘Grand Bargain’ in the Agenda for Humanity.

GPA’s work within this workstream:

Vision

Each stakeholder involved in humanitarian relief has, in its own capacity, access to the knowledge and expertise necessary to provide sustainable energy solutions in displacement settings. This can be enabled by conducive institutional structures, the ability to access common repositories, exchange platforms and global discussion groups, the availability of professional training and the possibility to draw specialist help from external resources. Enabling factors to achieve this vision are:

  • Institutional structures that enable in-house capacity for strategic energy programming and are conducive to partnerships that draw technical expertise from outside the humanitarian sector;
  • Tailored training packages in operational form to meet capacity and knowledge needs of each stakeholder;
  • A common central knowledge-sharing and practitioner-connection platform specifically on energy for humanitarian settings; and
  • Mechanisms to analyse and evaluate technical quality and effectiveness of energy-service delivery

GPA’s work within this workstream:

Vision

Harmonized, standardized, high-quality and usable data on sustainable and safe energy for the humanitarian sector is produced, used and shared for planning, learning, monitoring and evaluation. High-quality data and usable evidence are critical in supporting the objectives of the GPA, which will require the following:

  • Accurate and effective monitoring of energy needs and interventions to produce highquality, accurate and relevant data as a basis for evidence building and evaluation to ensure access to sustainable and safe energy and addressing protection risks.
  • Relevant data to be collected, utilizing existing mobile platform tools when possible and avoiding additional administrative burdens.
  • Non-personalized data to be digitally shared openly between stakeholders. Where possible, data should be harmonized and standardized to enable comparison and to facilitate effective monitoring and evaluation.
  • Humanitarian and energy actors to learn from each other to ensure a holistic and effective approach.
  • Inclusive learning processes and evidence-based decision-making that place the voices and needs of displaced people at the heart of sustainable energy responses.

GPA’s work within this workstream:

UNITAR - Project Image

The GPA does not prescribe the use of any specific coordination mechanism; nor does it advocate for the arbitrary creation of coordination mechanisms for humanitarian energy programming where they are not needed. Any coordination and planning mechanism addressing the energy needs of displaced people should be appropriate for the specific context, make use of existing structures, and adhere to principles of efficacy and inclusiveness.

Last updated: 09/08/2021